the piquant.

Taste The Taste I Taste 'Till It's Tasted

rachelfershleiser:

(via 2013 National Book Awards Finalists Reading, The National Book Foundation)
Tonight you can listen to readings by all 20 National Book Award finalists streaming live!
(Well, maybe Pynchon won’t show.)

rachelfershleiser:

(via 2013 National Book Awards Finalists Reading, The National Book Foundation)

Tonight you can listen to readings by all 20 National Book Award finalists streaming live!

(Well, maybe Pynchon won’t show.)

love.

love.

(Source: helloyoucreatives)

thesmithian:


"…the full story of the white women of black Harlem, women collectively referred to as ‘Miss Anne,’ has never been told.”

more.

thesmithian:

"…the full story of the white women of black Harlem, women collectively referred to as ‘Miss Anne,’ has never been told.”

more.

This Bridge Called My Back

TBCMB Cover

First published in 1981, This Bridge Called My Back has been out of print since the expiration of its contract with Third Woman Press in 2008. Hopefully the digital copy will find its way to those who will circulate it and possibly build up pressure to have it printed again.

URL Set:

Junot Díaz’s Keynote Speech at Facing Race 2012 [Excerpt] (by racialjustice)

I’m telling you guys, we’re never going to fucking get anywhere—if you want to hear my apocalyptic proclamation which I would never repeat, but which I know you motherfuckers are going to tweet about—we are never going to get anywhere as long as our economies of attraction continue to resemble, more or less, the economy of attraction of white supremacy.”

yes.
homedesigning:

Book Mountain
Fall Reading
thesmithian:


[Zadie] Smith’s radar-sharp ear for dialogue, her visceral sense of place and the rhythms of the London streets make for some animated and memorable scenes in this book…

built her up…now the tear-down…

Fall Reading

thesmithian:

[Zadie] Smith’s radar-sharp ear for dialogue, her visceral sense of place and the rhythms of the London streets make for some animated and memorable scenes in this book…

built her up…now the tear-down…

Summer Reading: The tina fey of Britain

Summer Reading: The tina fey of Britain

An interview with the Author…
http://www.bostonreview.net/BR37.4/junot_diaz_paula_moya_drown_race.php


The stories in This Is How You Lose Her, by turns hilarious and devastating, raucous and tender, lay bare the infinite longing and inevitable weaknesses of our all-too-human hearts. They capture the heat of new passion, the recklessness with which we betray what we most treasure, and the torture we go through - “the begging, the crawling over glass, the crying” - to try to mend what we’ve broken beyond repair. They recall the echoes that intimacy leaves behind, even where we thought we did not care. They teach us the catechism of affections: that the faithlessness of the fathers is visited upon the children; that what we do unto our exes is inevitably done in turn unto us; and that loving thy neighbor as thyself is a commandment more safely honored on platonic than erotic terms. Most of all, these stories remind us that the habit of passion always triumphs over experience, and that “love, when it hits us for real, has a half-life of forever.”

An interview with the Author…

http://www.bostonreview.net/BR37.4/junot_diaz_paula_moya_drown_race.php

The stories in This Is How You Lose Her, by turns hilarious and devastating, raucous and tender, lay bare the infinite longing and inevitable weaknesses of our all-too-human hearts. They capture the heat of new passion, the recklessness with which we betray what we most treasure, and the torture we go through - “the begging, the crawling over glass, the crying” - to try to mend what we’ve broken beyond repair. They recall the echoes that intimacy leaves behind, even where we thought we did not care. They teach us the catechism of affections: that the faithlessness of the fathers is visited upon the children; that what we do unto our exes is inevitably done in turn unto us; and that loving thy neighbor as thyself is a commandment more safely honored on platonic than erotic terms. Most of all, these stories remind us that the habit of passion always triumphs over experience, and that “love, when it hits us for real, has a half-life of forever.”

Summer Reading: Lionel Asbo
A savage, funny, and mysteriously poignant saga by a renowned author at the height of his powers. Lionel Asbo, a terrifying yet weirdly loyal thug (self-named after England’s notorious Anti-Social Behaviour Order), has always looked out for his ward and nephew, the orphaned Desmond Pepperdine.  He provides him with fatherly career advice (always carry a knife, for example) and is determined they should share the joys of pit bulls (fed with lots of Tabasco sauce), Internet porn, and all manner of more serious criminality.  Des, on the other hand, desires nothing more than books to read and a girl to love (and to protect a family secret that could be the death of him).  But just as he begins to lead a gentler, healthier life, his uncle—once again in a London prison—wins £140 million in the lottery and upon his release hires a public relations firm and begins dating a cannily ambitious topless model and “poet.”  Strangely, however, Lionel’s true nature remains uncompromised while his problems, and therefore also Desmond’s, seem only to multiply.

Summer Reading: Lionel Asbo

A savage, funny, and mysteriously poignant saga by a renowned author at the height of his powers. 

Lionel Asbo, a terrifying yet weirdly loyal thug (self-named after England’s notorious Anti-Social Behaviour Order), has always looked out for his ward and nephew, the orphaned Desmond Pepperdine.  He provides him with fatherly career advice (always carry a knife, for example) and is determined they should share the joys of pit bulls (fed with lots of Tabasco sauce), Internet porn, and all manner of more serious criminality.  Des, on the other hand, desires nothing more than books to read and a girl to love (and to protect a family secret that could be the death of him).  But just as he begins to lead a gentler, healthier life, his uncle—once again in a London prison—wins £140 million in the lottery and upon his release hires a public relations firm and begins dating a cannily ambitious topless model and “poet.”  Strangely, however, Lionel’s true nature remains uncompromised while his problems, and therefore also Desmond’s, seem only to multiply.

Summer Reading
In All We Know, Lisa Cohen describes these women’s glamorous choices, complicated failures, and controversial personal lives with lyricism and empathy. At once a series of intimate portraits and a startling investigation into style, celebrity, sexuality, and the genre of biography itself, All We Know explores a hidden history of modernism and pays tribute to three compelling lives.

Esther Murphy was a brilliant New York intellectual who dazzled friends and strangers with an unstoppable flow of conversation. But she never finished the books she was contracted to write—a painful failure and yet a kind of achievement.The quintessential fan, Mercedes de Acosta had intimate friendships with the legendary actresses and dancers of the twentieth century. Her ephemeral legacy lies in the thousands of objects she collected to preserve the memory of those performers and to honor the feelings they inspired.An icon of haute couture and a fashion editor of British Vogue, Madge Garland held bracing views on dress that drew on her feminism, her ideas about modernity, and her love of women. Existing both vividly and invisibly at the center of cultural life, she—like Murphy and de Acosta—is now almost completely forgotten.

Summer Reading

In All We Know, Lisa Cohen describes these women’s glamorous choices, complicated failures, and controversial personal lives with lyricism and empathy. At once a series of intimate portraits and a startling investigation into style, celebrity, sexuality, and the genre of biography itself, All We Know explores a hidden history of modernism and pays tribute to three compelling lives.

Esther Murphy was a brilliant New York intellectual who dazzled friends and strangers with an unstoppable flow of conversation. But she never finished the books she was contracted to write—a painful failure and yet a kind of achievement.

The quintessential fan, Mercedes de Acosta had intimate friendships with the legendary actresses and dancers of the twentieth century. Her ephemeral legacy lies in the thousands of objects she collected to preserve the memory of those performers and to honor the feelings they inspired.

An icon of haute couture and a fashion editor of British Vogue, Madge Garland held bracing views on dress that drew on her feminism, her ideas about modernity, and her love of women. Existing both vividly and invisibly at the center of cultural life, she—like Murphy and de Acosta—is now almost completely forgotten.

Summer Reading"First of all, Dave Hill is a pathological liar, a fantasist, egoist, and unlicensed podiatrist. I cannot confirm the veracity of anything in this book, but my feet have never felt better. And as Dave always says, when you have your feet, you have everything." —Janeane Garofalo

Summer Reading
"First of all, Dave Hill is a pathological liar, a fantasist, egoist, and unlicensed podiatrist. I cannot confirm the veracity of anything in this book, but my feet have never felt better. And as Dave always says, when you have your feet, you have everything." —Janeane Garofalo

Summer Reading
“A perfect summer read. It is also one of the bravest, strangest, most original novels I’ve read this year…We care about Sheila’s plight, but the souls in limbo here are, ultimately, our own. With so many references to the world outside of the fiction, this novel demands to know: Can art inform our lives, and tell us how to be?”—The Boston Globe

Read an excerpt : http://www.howshouldapersonbe.com/excerpt2012.html

Summer Reading

“A perfect summer read. It is also one of the bravest, strangest, most original novels I’ve read this year…We care about Sheila’s plight, but the souls in limbo here are, ultimately, our own. With so many references to the world outside of the fiction, this novel demands to know: Can art inform our lives, and tell us how to be?”The Boston Globe

Read an excerpt : http://www.howshouldapersonbe.com/excerpt2012.html

Summer Reading
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/17/books/review/gillian-flynns-gone-girl-and-more.html