the piquant.

Taste The Taste I Taste 'Till It's Tasted

Summer Reading
thesmithian:


The city is both ambiguous and defined, with endless quirks but also finite borders. It’s housing and politics and slang and disease and a zillion other things, a fractal-like creature that becomes more complex the closer you look. Delving in is exciting but also a little intimidating.

more.

Summer Reading

thesmithian:

The city is both ambiguous and defined, with endless quirks but also finite borders. It’s housing and politics and slang and disease and a zillion other things, a fractal-like creature that becomes more complex the closer you look. Delving in is exciting but also a little intimidating.

more.

Delusions of Gender
ilovecharts:


typingfrantically:
This book deals with debunking “Neurosexism,” which is a very fancy term for all of that evolutionary psychology bullshit that people spill about those “brain differences” between boys and girls.
This book debunks such myths as:
Boys are better at math than girls
Women make crappy lawyers/business CEOs/etc, as their brains are not cut out for aggression.
Men make crappy counselors/primary school teachers/primary parents/etc, as their brains are not cut out for empathy.
MEN ARE BUILT FOR GOING OUT AND HUNTING WHILE WOMEN ARE BUILT FOR STAYING HOME AND BABYMAKING IT’S NOT SEXISM IT’S JUST BIOLOGY
And many other such myths.
Furthermore, this book covers topics such as: 
Neurosexism and gender perceptions in multiple races (as this is not a singularly white experience, just as the western world isn’t a singularly white experience)
Sex discrimination in the workplace, and how women are (or, more often, are not) allowed to behave
How science is used (badly) to support many of these claims
Experiences of trans* people, both through interviews and empirical studies.

Delusions of Gender

ilovecharts:

typingfrantically:

This book deals with debunking “Neurosexism,” which is a very fancy term for all of that evolutionary psychology bullshit that people spill about those “brain differences” between boys and girls.

This book debunks such myths as:

  • Boys are better at math than girls
  • Women make crappy lawyers/business CEOs/etc, as their brains are not cut out for aggression.
  • Men make crappy counselors/primary school teachers/primary parents/etc, as their brains are not cut out for empathy.
  • MEN ARE BUILT FOR GOING OUT AND HUNTING WHILE WOMEN ARE BUILT FOR STAYING HOME AND BABYMAKING IT’S NOT SEXISM IT’S JUST BIOLOGY
  • And many other such myths.

Furthermore, this book covers topics such as: 

  • Neurosexism and gender perceptions in multiple races (as this is not a singularly white experience, just as the western world isn’t a singularly white experience)
  • Sex discrimination in the workplace, and how women are (or, more often, are not) allowed to behave
  • How science is used (badly) to support many of these claims
  • Experiences of trans* people, both through interviews and empirical studies.

(Source: chromaluv)

Summer Reading:
Art dealer Peter Harris and his magazine editor wife Rebecca are settled into a comfortable life in Manhattan’s art scene, until their staid existence is disrupted by the arrival of Ethan, Rebecca’s much younger brother whose nickname—Mizzy, short for “The Mistake”—belies his whimsical attitude and overall fuckup station in life. Mizzy wants to pursue a career in the arts, and upends the whole household in the process.

Summer Reading:

Art dealer Peter Harris and his magazine editor wife Rebecca are settled into a comfortable life in Manhattan’s art scene, until their staid existence is disrupted by the arrival of Ethan, Rebecca’s much younger brother whose nickname—Mizzy, short for “The Mistake”—belies his whimsical attitude and overall fuckup station in life. Mizzy wants to pursue a career in the arts, and upends the whole household in the process.

Summer Reading:

The failure of the marriage between Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes has always been considered from one of two conflicting viewpoints: hers or his. Missing for more than four decades has been a third perspective on the events that brought their marriage to its ill-fated end, the story of another—the other—woman: Hughes’ mistress Assia Wevill.Like Plath before her, Assia shared her life with Hughes for seven years, until she took her own life and that of their daughter at the age of forty-two, in a manner that nearly replicated Plath’s suicide six years earlier. Drawing on previously unavailable documents and private papers, including Assia’s diaries and her intimate correspondence with Hughes, this book shows the vital influence Assia exerted on the poet and his work, and the uneasy life they shared under the long shadow of Plath.

Summer Reading:

The failure of the marriage between Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes has always been considered from one of two conflicting viewpoints: hers or his. Missing for more than four decades has been a third perspective on the events that brought their marriage to its ill-fated end, the story of another—the other—woman: Hughes’ mistress Assia Wevill.

Like Plath before her, Assia shared her life with Hughes for seven years, until she took her own life and that of their daughter at the age of forty-two, in a manner that nearly replicated Plath’s suicide six years earlier. Drawing on previously unavailable documents and private papers, including Assia’s diaries and her intimate correspondence with Hughes, this book shows the vital influence Assia exerted on the poet and his work, and the uneasy life they shared under the long shadow of Plath.

Stephen L. Carter’s newest book

Stephen L. Carter’s thrilling new novel takes as its starting point an alternate history: President Abraham Lincoln survives the assassination attempt at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. Two years later he is charged with overstepping his constitutional authority, both during and after the Civil War, and faces an impeachment trial … Twenty-one-year-old Abigail Canner is a young black woman with a degree from Oberlin, a letter of employment from the law firm that has undertaken Lincoln’s defense, and the iron-strong conviction, learned from her late mother, that “whatever limitations society might place on ordinary negroes, they would never apply to her.” And so Abigail embarks on a life that defies the norms of every stratum of Washington society: working side by side with a white clerk, meeting the great and powerful of the nation, including the president himself.  But when Lincoln’s lead counsel is found brutally murdered on the eve of the trial, Abigail is plunged into a treacherous web of intrigue and conspiracy reaching the highest levels of the divided government. Here is a vividly imagined work of historical fiction that captures the emotional tenor of post–Civil War America, a brilliantly realized courtroom drama that explores the always contentious question of the nature of presidential authority, and a galvanizing story of political suspense.

Stephen L. Carter’s newest book

Stephen L. Carter’s thrilling new novel takes as its starting point an alternate history: President Abraham Lincoln survives the assassination attempt at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. Two years later he is charged with overstepping his constitutional authority, both during and after the Civil War, and faces an impeachment trial …

Twenty-one-year-old Abigail Canner is a young black woman with a degree from Oberlin, a letter of employment from the law firm that has undertaken Lincoln’s defense, and the iron-strong conviction, learned from her late mother, that “whatever limitations society might place on ordinary negroes, they would never apply to her.” And so Abigail embarks on a life that defies the norms of every stratum of Washington society: working side by side with a white clerk, meeting the great and powerful of the nation, including the president himself.  But when Lincoln’s lead counsel is found brutally murdered on the eve of the trial, Abigail is plunged into a treacherous web of intrigue and conspiracy reaching the highest levels of the divided government.

Here is a vividly imagined work of historical fiction that captures the emotional tenor of post–Civil War America, a brilliantly realized courtroom drama that explores the always contentious question of the nature of presidential authority, and a galvanizing story of political suspense.

I LOVE libraries. 
Seattle Public Library - OMA - Rem Koolhaas by Scott Norsworthy on Flickr.
Young Pres Barry’s love life?  a stunning new multigenerational biography of Barack Obama" by #DavidMaraniss
From the diary of one of his lovers “I open the door, that Barack keeps closed, to his room, and enter into a warm, private space pervaded by a mixture of smells that so strongly speak of his presence, his liveliness, his habits—running sweat, Brut spray deodorant, smoking, eating raisins, sleeping, breathing.”

Maraniss’ excerpt also contains portions from Barack Obama’s college love letters, which reference T.S. Eliot, “bourgeois liberalism,” and Jacques Derrida. Turns out young Barack Obama could have been a character in Girls. [Vanity Fair]

Young Pres Barry’s love life? a stunning new multigenerational biography of Barack Obama" by #DavidMaraniss

From the diary of one of his lovers “I open the door, that Barack keeps closed, to his room, and enter into a warm, private space pervaded by a mixture of smells that so strongly speak of his presence, his liveliness, his habits—running sweat, Brut spray deodorant, smoking, eating raisins, sleeping, breathing.”

Maraniss’ excerpt also contains portions from Barack Obama’s college love letters, which reference T.S. Eliot, “bourgeois liberalism,” and Jacques Derrida. Turns out young Barack Obama could have been a character in Girls. [Vanity Fair]

“I have been standing on the side of life, watching it float by. I want to swim in the river. I want to feel the current.”
So writes Mamah Borthwick Cheney in her diary as she struggles to justify her clandestine love affair with Frank Lloyd Wright.

“I have been standing on the side of life, watching it float by. I want to swim in the river. I want to feel the current.”

So writes Mamah Borthwick Cheney in her diary as she struggles to justify her clandestine love affair with Frank Lloyd Wright.
thesmithian:


[it] gradually opens out into a…moving story about a woman trying to negotiate two cultures, balancing her parents’ expectations with her own aspirations, her ambition and cynical practicality with deeper, more romantic yearnings. The premise: Amina, a determined young Bangladeshi, meets an older American man named George on an online dating site…she eventually moves to America and marries him. It is more like the arranged marriage of Amina’s grandparents than like her parents’ love match.

more.

thesmithian:

[it] gradually opens out into a…moving story about a woman trying to negotiate two cultures, balancing her parents’ expectations with her own aspirations, her ambition and cynical practicality with deeper, more romantic yearnings. The premise: Amina, a determined young Bangladeshi, meets an older American man named George on an online dating site…she eventually moves to America and marries him. It is more like the arranged marriage of Amina’s grandparents than like her parents’ love match.

more.

Teju Cole’s enigmatic new book ‘Open City’ is truly unusual. Imagine a book that, when doused with the rich waters of the writer’s curiosity and intellect, grows exponentially until it overwhelms the reader’s senses. In this experiment, Cole takes a different approach to writing a novel. There is virtually no plot to the novel, to use the term novel loosely, and the author dispenses with the use of quotes in dialogue. Thankfully, ‘Open City’ is a monologue a lot of times; Julius is in love with the sound of his own voice. Furthermore, it seems that every plot is hatched and allowed to promptly disappear into the catacombs of New York City and Europe, the settings for the book. The novel is rich and messy. Just like life

Teju Cole’s enigmatic new book ‘Open City’ is truly unusual. Imagine a book that, when doused with the rich waters of the writer’s curiosity and intellect, grows exponentially until it overwhelms the reader’s senses. In this experiment, Cole takes a different approach to writing a novel. There is virtually no plot to the novel, to use the term novel loosely, and the author dispenses with the use of quotes in dialogue. Thankfully, ‘Open City’ is a monologue a lot of times; Julius is in love with the sound of his own voice. Furthermore, it seems that every plot is hatched and allowed to promptly disappear into the catacombs of New York City and Europe, the settings for the book. The novel is rich and messy. Just like life

I love this idea. (click the image to go to the website)

I love this idea. (click the image to go to the website)

Adorbs. (http://www.nobodyandco.it/)
Albert Einstein knew some things. 

Via

@etsy.com

Albert Einstein knew some things. 

Via

@etsy.com

(Source: betype)

teachingliteracy:

10 Novels That Will Sharpen Your Mind [Interactive]
Novels may be made up, but the emotions they evoke are real. These feelings grow out of our connection to the novel’s characters and the relationships between a protagonist and others in the context of the broader society. As we follow the ups and downs of a carefully crafted story, we build connections within the social and emotional regions of the brain. The result, according to recent research, is a better understanding of other human beings and a deeper empathy for others, leading to improved social skills. Historians have also claimed that great works of fiction have lent support to the concept of human rights. (For more on the psychology of fiction, see “In the Minds of Others,” by Keith Oatley, Scientific American Mind, November/December 2011.)
Click the link and check out the interactive features.

teachingliteracy:

10 Novels That Will Sharpen Your Mind [Interactive]

Novels may be made up, but the emotions they evoke are real. These feelings grow out of our connection to the novel’s characters and the relationships between a protagonist and others in the context of the broader society. As we follow the ups and downs of a carefully crafted story, we build connections within the social and emotional regions of the brain. The result, according to recent research, is a better understanding of other human beings and a deeper empathy for others, leading to improved social skills. Historians have also claimed that great works of fiction have lent support to the concept of human rights. (For more on the psychology of fiction, see “In the Minds of Others,” by Keith Oatley, Scientific American Mind, November/December 2011.)

Click the link and check out the interactive features.

(Source: approachingsignificance, via npr)